Private Full-Day Tour Visiting Giza Pyramids, Transfers and Lunch Included

Private guided tour includes all pickup and drop-off transfers by private vehicle with air-conditioning as well as the main entry fees, certified tour guide, lunch, snacks, and water.

Possibilities of enter any of the pyramids or ridding Camel ride but it would be a subject of extra supplement 30 Minutes camel ride around Giza Pyramids would cost 10 $ & 20 $ for an hour ride per person

per adult from

$109

NZD

Duration

7 to 8 hours

Pickup

Hotel pickup available

Voucher

Mobile ticket

Select Date and Travellers

No tour options available.

  • What's included :
    • entry fees
    • Lunch at Local restaurant
    • Snacks
    • Qualified Egyptologist guide
    • All Transfers By Private A/C Vehicle Newest Model
    • Private tour
    • Entry/Admission - Pyramids of Giza
    • Entry/Admission - Great Sphinx
    • Entry/Admission - Step Pyramid of Djoser
    • Entry/Admission - Memphis and Sakkara
    What's excluded :
    • Gratuities
    • Drinks
    • any Optional Tours i.e entering any of the Pyramids it Requires additional Tickets can be bought during the visit(Ticket of inside the great Pyramid 22.50 $, Ticket of the Middle Pyramid 7.50 $, Solar Boat Museum 7.50
    • Entry/Admission - Khafre's Pyramid
    • Entry/Admission - Great Pyramid of Cheops (Khufu)
  • This is a typical itinerary for this product

    Stop At: Pyramids of Giza, Al Haram Str., Giza 12611 Egypt

    The Giza pyramid complex, also called the Giza Necropolis, is the site on the Giza Plateau in Greater Cairo, Egypt that includes the Great Pyramid of Giza, the Pyramid of Khafre, and the Pyramid of Menkaure, along with their associated pyramid complexes and the Great Sphinx of Giza. All were built during the Fourth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom of Ancient Egypt. The site also includes several cemeteries and the remains of a workers' village.

    The site is at the edges of the Western Desert, approximately 9 km (5 mi) west of the Nile River in the city of Giza, and about 13 km (8 mi) southwest of the city centre of Cairo.

    The Great Pyramid and the Pyramid of Khafre are the largest pyramids built in ancient Egypt, and they have historically been common as emblems of ancient Egypt in the Western imagination. They were popularised in Hellenistic times, when the Great Pyramid was listed by Antipater of Sidon as one of the Seven Wonders of the World. It is by far the oldest of the ancient Wonders and the only one still in existence.

    Duration: 3 hours

    Stop At: Great Sphinx, Al-Haram, Giza Egypt

    The Great Sphinx of Giza, commonly referred to as the Sphinx of Giza or just the Sphinx, is a limestone statue of a reclining sphinx, a mythical creature with the body of a lion and the head of a human.[1] Facing directly from West to East, it stands on the Giza Plateau on the west bank of the Nile in Giza, Egypt. The face of the Sphinx is generally believed to represent the pharaoh Khafre.[2]

    Cut from the bedrock, the original shape of the Sphinx has been restored with layers of blocks.[3] It measures 73 m (240 ft) long from paw to tail, 20 m (66 ft) high from the base to the top of the head and 19 m (62 ft) wide at its rear haunches.[4] It is the oldest known monumental sculpture in Egypt and is commonly believed to have been built by ancient Egyptians of the Old Kingdom during the reign of the pharaoh Khafre (c. 2558–2532 BC)

    Duration: 30 minutes

    Stop At: Khafre's Pyramid, Al Haram, Giza Egypt

    The Pyramid of Khafre or of Chephren[2] (Arabic: هرم خفرع‎, romanized: haram ḵafraʿ, IPA: [haram xafraʕ]) is the second-tallest and second-largest of the Ancient Egyptian Pyramids of Giza and the tomb of the Fourth-Dynasty pharaoh Khafre (Chefren), who ruled from c. 2558 to 2532 BC

    Duration: 20 minutes

    Stop At: Great Pyramid of Cheops (Khufu), Giza Egypt

    The Great Pyramid of Giza (also known as the Pyramid of Khufu or the Pyramid of Cheops) is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza pyramid complex bordering present-day Giza in Greater Cairo, Egypt. It is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one to remain largely intact.

    Based on a mark in an interior chamber naming the work gang and a reference to the Fourth Dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Khufu, some Egyptologists believe that the pyramid was thus built as a tomb over a 10- to 20-year period concluding around 2560 BC. Initially standing at 146.5 metres (481 feet), the Great Pyramid was the tallest man-made structure in the world for more than 3,800 years until Lincoln Cathedral was finished in 1311 AD. Originally, the Great Pyramid was covered by limestone casing stones that formed a smooth outer surface; what is seen today is the underlying core structure. Some of the casing stones that once covered the structure can still be seen around the base. There have been varying scientific and alternative theories about the Great Pyramid's construction techniques. Most accepted construction hypotheses are based on the idea that it was built by moving huge stones from a quarry and dragging and lifting them into place.

    There are three known chambers inside the Great Pyramid. The lowest chamber is cut into the bedrock upon which the pyramid was built and was unfinished. The so-called[2] Queen's Chamber and King's Chamber are higher up within the pyramid structure. The main part of the Giza complex is a set of buildings that included two mortuary temples in honour of Khufu (one close to the pyramid and one near the Nile), three smaller pyramids for Khufu's wives, an even smaller "satellite" pyramid, a raised causeway connecting the two temples, and small mastaba tombs for nobles surrounding the pyramid

    Duration: 20 minutes

    Stop At: Step Pyramid of Djoser, Saqqara Egypt

    The Pyramid of Djoser (or Djeser and Zoser), or Step Pyramid (kbhw-ntrw in Egyptian) is an archaeological remain in the Saqqara necropolis, Egypt, northwest of the city of Memphis. The 6-tier, 4-sided structure is the earliest colossal stone building in Egypt. It was built in the 27th century BC during the Third Dynasty for the burial of Pharaoh Djoser by his vizier, Imhotep. The pyramid is the central feature of a vast mortuary complex in an enormous courtyard surrounded by ceremonial structures and decoration.

    The pyramid went through several revisions and redevelopments of the original plan. The pyramid originally stood 62.5 metres (205 ft) tall, with a base of 109 m × 121 m (358 ft × 397 ft) and was clad in polished white limestone. The step pyramid (or proto-pyramid) is considered to be the earliest large-scale cut stone construction, although the nearby enclosure of Gisr el-Mudir predates the complex, and the South American pyramids at Caral are contemporary.

    Saqqara (Arabic: سقارة‎, Egyptian Arabic pronunciation: [sɑʔˈʔɑːɾɑ]), also spelled Sakkara or Saccara in English /səˈkɑːrə/, is a vast, ancient burial ground in Egypt, serving as the necropolis for the Ancient Egyptian capital, Memphis. Saqqara features numerous pyramids, including the world-famous Step pyramid of Djoser, sometimes referred to as the Step Tomb due to its rectangular base, as well as a number of mastabas (Arabic word meaning 'bench'). Located some 30 km (19 mi) south of modern-day Cairo, Saqqara covers an area of around 7 by 1.5 km (4.35 by 0.93 mi).

    At Saqqara, the oldest complete stone building complex known in history was built; Djoser's step pyramid, built during the Third Dynasty. Another 16 Egyptian kings built pyramids at Saqqara, which are now in various states of preservation or dilapidation. High officials added private funeral monuments to this necropolis during the entire pharaonic period. It remained an important complex for non-royal burials and cult ceremonies for more than 3,000 years, well into Ptolemaic and Roman times.

    North of the area known as Saqqara lies Abusir, and south lies Dahshur. The area running from Giza to Dahshur has been used as a necropolis by the inhabitants of Memphis at different times, and it was designated as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1979.Some scholars believe that the name Saqqara is not derived from the ancient Egyptian funerary deity, Sokar, but supposedly, from a local Berber Tribe called Beni Saqqar

    Duration: 2 hours

    Stop At: Memphis and Sakkara, Saqqara 12919 Egypt

    Memphis (Arabic: مَنْف‎ Manf pronounced [mænf]; Bohairic Coptic: ⲙⲉⲙϥⲓ; Greek: Μέμφις) was the ancient capital of Inebu-hedj, the first nome of Lower Egypt. Its ruins are located near the town of Mit Rahina, 20 km (12 mi) south of Giza in Greater Cairo, Egypt.

    According to legend, as related by Manetho, the city was founded by the Pharaoh Menes. It was the Capital of ancient Egypt during the Old Kingdom and remained an important city throughout ancient Egyptian history.[2][3][4] It occupied a strategic position at the mouth of the Nile Delta, and was home to bustling activity. Its principal port, Peru-nefer, featured a high density of workshops, factories, and warehouses that distributed food and merchandise throughout the ancient kingdom. During its golden age, Memphis thrived as a regional centre for commerce, trade, and religion.

    Memphis was believed to be under the protection of the god Ptah, the patron of craftsmen. Its great temple, Hut-ka-Ptah (meaning "Enclosure of the ka of Ptah"), was one of the most prominent structures in the city. The name of this temple, rendered in Greek as Aἴγυπτoς (Ai-gy-ptos) by the historian Manetho, is believed to be the etymological origin of the modern English name Egypt.

    The history of Memphis is closely linked to that of the country itself. Its eventual downfall is believed to have been due to the loss of its economic significance in late antiquity, following the rise of coastal Alexandria. Its religious significance also diminished after the abandonment of the ancient religion, following the Edict of Thessalonica.

    The ruins of the former capital today offer fragmented evidence of its past. They have been preserved, along with the pyramid complex at Giza, as a World Heritage Site since 1979. The site is open to the public as an open-air museum.

    Duration: 30 minutes

  • Departure Point :
    Traveler pickup is offered
    Our Tour guide will be waiting inside the lobby and he will be holding a sign shows our company name Emo Tours
    Departure Time :
    8:00 AM
    Return Detail :
    -
    Hotel Pickup :
    • Confirmation will be received at time of booking
    • Infant meals not included
    • Children must be accompanied by an adult
    • Not wheelchair accessible
    • Most travelers can participate
    • This is a private tour/activity. Only your group will participate
    • Face masks required for travelers in public areas
    • Face masks required for guides in public areas
    • Face masks provided for travelers
    • Hand sanitizer available to travelers and staff
    • Social distancing enforced throughout experience
    • Regularly sanitized high-traffic areas
    • Gear/equipment sanitized between use
    • Transportation vehicles regularly sanitized
    • Guides required to regularly wash hands
    • Temperature checks for travelers upon arrival
    • Contactless payments for gratuities and add-ons
  • You can present either a paper or an electronic voucher for this activity.
  • For a full refund, cancel at least 24 hours in advance of the start date of the experience.

Language

English - Guide

Age Req.

-

Fitness Req.

None

Group Size

15

Organised by EMO TOURS EGYPT

Activity ID: V-10726P1

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